STD information database

  1. I got sperm in my face, do I need to get tested?

    I got sperm in my face, do I need to get tested?
    Facial sex is when a man ejaculates on a woman's or other man's face. the eyes can be an open gate to your bloodstream and inner body, the same way that your genitals are. The eyes do not serve as a barrier as skin does. On the contrary, they are very vulnerable. When sperm enters the eye through facial sex, it might hurt, because it contains acid phosphatase and citric acid. Since it can access the eyes and reach the bloodstream, semen can also transmit bacteria, viruses and STDs. → Continue reading
  2. I have a blister on my penis, should I get tested?

    I have a blister on my penis, should I get tested?
    Lesions on the penis can be a sign of an STD. Blisters, sores, or bumps on the genital area may indicate a bacterial or viral STD. Herpes or syphilis, for example, may commence their course with a small blister. Having a blister on your penis can be anything from an STD to a skin condition or even cancer. Today, it is almost effortless to find out whether you have an STD or not. STD rapid kit tests are widely-used testing methods that allow you to get tested alone at home and have your results in fifteen minutes. → Continue reading
  3. Do I need an STD test kit after being sexually assaulted?

    Do I need an STD test kit after being sexually assaulted?
    Individuals who got sexually assaulted or abused often have questions regarding the risk of acquiring an STD, among other issues that concern them. Generally speaking, such individuals require a specific approach, as far as they report their assault, including general assessments and psychological evaluation.  What is an STD? STDs are sexually transmitted diseases that you can acquire through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis are the three most prevalent sexually transmitted infections. Some of the... → Continue reading
  4. Can you die from HIV?

    Can you die from HIV?
    What is HIV? HIV is a sexually transmitted infection (STD) that you can acquire through unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex. The body fluids through which you can get HIV are blood, semen, pre-ejaculate, vaginal and rectal fluids, and breast milk of infected individuals. Most commonly, people acquire HIV through sexual activity. However, others get it through sharing needles, razors, or syringes when using injectable drugs. Data from 2018 suggest that an estimated 37.9 million people have HIV globally... → Continue reading
  5. Can I get an STD from getting fingered

    Can I get an STD from getting fingered
    People have sex in many different ways. Some enjoy penetration, while others prefer skin-to-skin, genital-to-genital, or mouth-to-genital rubbing, known as frottage. Other ways to receive or offer sexual pleasure is oral sex. Fingering is when you use your fingers and hands to stimulate your partner sexually. Other means to refer to fingering are digital vaginal penetration, manual penetration, and heavy petting. Fingering might be a sexual act that gives pleasure alone or be part of foreplay. Most people believe... → Continue reading
  6. Chronic STDs increase your risk for urogenital cancer

    Chronic STDs increase your risk for urogenital cancer
    What is a chronic STD An STD is a sexually transmitted infection that you can acquire through risky sexual behaviors, such as unprotected sex. Some STDs become chronic if left untreated. Others that are not curable might become chronic but managed and controlled with medication. STDs can be viral or the result of bacterial or parasitic causes. Some examples of persistent viral STDs are herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Studies suggest that having a chronic STD increases your... → Continue reading
  7. Test options for chlamydia patients

    Test options for chlamydia patients
    Chlamydia, caused by the bacterium chlamydia trachomatis, is a prevalent STD that affected 1,758,668 people in the US, in 2018. Chlamydia patients are often asymptomatic, meaning they might spread the disease because they are not aware they have it. Screening tests are necessary to identify chlamydia cases in adults and teenagers. Chlamydia left untreated can lead to severe complications in both sexes. Chronic chlamydia infection can result in permanent infertility in women. The disease can also affect your unborn... → Continue reading
  8. Where to buy STD rapid test kits

    Where to buy STD rapid test kits
    STD rapid kit tests are safe, easy to use at home, and 99% accurate solutions that allow you to take control of your sexual health. But why an STD rapid kit test instead of a clinic? If you are busy or just embarrassed to visit a clinic and get tested, but you're remarkably worried at the same time, buy an STD rapid kit test from us. We offer our clients results in fifteen minutes and discreet delivery worldwide. If you met a new partner and want to get tested before sex, make sure you discuss it with them and get tested both. → Continue reading
  9. What STDs can you get from oral sex?

    What STDs can you get from oral sex?
    Oral sex involves using the mouth, lips, and tongue to provide sexual pleasure to your partner's genitals. Performing oral sex to an individual with an STD might result in the spread of the STI in your mouth or throat. The risk of getting a particular STD depends on several factors, such as the pathogen that causes the STI, the specific sexual acts involved, the frequency of these acts, and the prevalence of the particular STD in the community in which both partners belong. → Continue reading
  10. Syphilis symptom checker

    Syphilis symptom checker
    Syphilis symptoms might look like signs of other diseases due to their high heterogeneity. Through the years, the condition took the nickname The Great Pretender because it looked like it could mimic so many other diseases, making it a quite challenging diagnosis. Therefore, it is almost impossible to diagnose syphilis without getting tested and only by relying on its symptomatology. The following are the four stages of syphilis, primary and secondary ones being the most contagious. → Continue reading

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