Time has passed quite rapidly since the 1980’s. This was the decade of so many things and ideas. It was mainly a decade of change and more expression. Much progress has been made since then and this is all positive. But this is also the decade that AIDS and HIV first came into prominence. This is the time of much change and upheaval especially in the way sexual promiscuity was viewed. AIDS and HIV made a huge dent in the general consciousness of society. It made people stop and consider the dangerous and potentially life threatening effects of STDs. It raised a lot of awareness and raised many eyebrows. People turned to consider things in a different way. But that was then and this is now. How has anything changed?

 

Times have changed

In retrospect, times have changed a lot. Different things have brought on different ways of doing things. This is no longer the 80’s and people feel it. This is the age of information and much progress. In this day and age, it is hard to keep a secret or to remain unprogressive. And this can be said of AIDS and the general attitude and treatments now.

 

Many new treatments

Overall there is improvement and it is noticeable. Whereas before contracting HIV was almost a death sentence. Once you contracted it then, the best thing you could hope for was that the HIV did not morph into AIDS. Essentially it was just a deadly game of crossing fingers and hoping for the best. Fortunately, this is no longer the case. There have been so many numerous advances in medicine and many new advances and treatments have come into the fore. One such method is AntiRetroviral Therapy. This promising form of treatment can prolong the development of HIV into AIDS and guarantee as long as 33 years to someone with HIV. That is surely good news. 

 

New attitudes

Even attitudes are changing. While AIDS victims may still suffer some social stigma from getting the disease, slowly people are opening their eyes and being less judgmental about the disease. They are now slowly seeing it for what it really is. It is not some harsh punishment met by fate to irresponsible people. It is what it is. It is a sickness and condition. And those who have it, do not deserve to be judged or condemned. They deserve sympathy and understanding as human beings. This is their right and they deserve this. A lot more awareness to the disease is being raised and making people see that it is really a sickness that must be treated more than anything else. Generally people have come a very long way indeed. But there is so much to still do and there is so much room for improvement. With the passage of time such improvements are sure to come and we will see them in our lifetimes. It is a positive time of hope and it is all there.